Tuesday, March 23, 2010

How well I remember the advertising slogan of the day:
"Eat the flour and wear the sack--
If you're not satisfied, your money back!"

HOW I WELL REMEMBER PRINTED FLOUR SACK DRESSES! HOW WE LOOKED FORWARD

TO MOM & DAD BUYING MORE FLOUR & FEED FOR THE CHICKENS TOO.


1930's flour sacks

THE FLOUR SACK


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BY COLLEEN B. HUBERT



IN THAT LONG AGO TIME WHEN THINGS WERE SAVED,
WHEN ROADS WERE GRAVELED AND BARRELS WERE STAVED,
WHEN WORN-OUT CLOTHING WAS USED AS RAGS,
AND THERE WERE NO PLASTIC WRAP OR BAGS,
AND THE WELL AND THE PUMP WERE WAY OUT BACK,
A VERSITILE ITEM, WAS THE FLOUR SACK.

PILLSBURY'S BEST, MOTHER'S AND GOLD MEDAL, TOO
STAMPED THEIR NAMES PROUDLY IN PURPLE AND BLUE.

THE STRING SEWN ON TOP WAS PULLED AND KEPT;
THE FLOUR EMPTIED AND SPILLS WERE SWEPT.
THE BAG WAS FOLDED AND STORED IN A SACK
THAT DURABLE, PRACTICAL FLOUR SACK.

THE SACK COULD BE FILLED WITH FEATHERS AND DOWN,
FOR A PILLOW, OR T'WOULD MAKE A NICE SLEEPING GOWN.
IT COULD CARRY A BOOK AND BE A SCHOOL BAG,
OR BECOME A MAIL SACK SLUNG OVER A NAG.
IT MADE A VERY CONVENIENT PACK,
THAT ADAPTABLE, COTTON FLOUR SACK.

BLEACHED AND SEWN, IT WAS DUTIFULLY WORN
AS BIBS, DIAPERS, OR KERCHIEF ADORNED.
IT WAS MADE INTO SKIRTS, BLOUSES AND SLIPS.
AND MOM BRAIDED RUGS FROM ONE HUNDRED STRIPS
SHE MADE RUFFLED CURTAINS FOR THE HOUSE OR SHACK,
FROM THAT HUMBLE BUT TREASURED FLOUR SACK!

AS A STRAINER FOR MILK OR APPLE JUICE,
TO WAVE MEN IN, IT WAS A VERY GOOD USE,
AS A SLING FOR A SPRAINED WRIST OR A BREAK,
TO HELP MOTHER ROLL UP A JELLY CAKE,
AS A WINDOW SHADE OR TO STUFF A CRACK,
WE USED A STURDY, COMMON FLOUR SACK!

AS DISH TOWELS, EMBROIDERED OR NOT,
THEY COVERED UP DOUGH, HELPED PASS PANS SO HOT,
TIED UP DISHES FOR NEIGHBORS IN NEED,
AND FOR MEN OUT IN THE FIELD TO SEED.
THEY DRIED DISHES FROM PAN, NOT RACK
THAT ABSORBENT, HANDY FLOUR SACK!

WE POLISHED AND CLEANED STOVE AND TABLE,
SCOURED AND SCRUBBED FROM CELLAR TO GABLE,
WE DUSTED THE BUREAU AND OAK BED POST,
MADE COSTUMES FOR OCTOBER (A SCARY GHOST)
AND A PARACHUTE FOR A CAT NAMED JACK.
FROM THAT LOWLY, USEFUL OLD FLOUR SACK!

SO NOW MY FRIENDS, WHEN THEY ASK YOU
AS CURIOUS YOUNGSTERS OFTEN DO,
"BEFORE PLASTIC WRAP, ELMERS GLUE
AND PAPER TOWELS, WHAT DID YOU DO?"
TELL THEM LOUDLY AND WITH PRIDE DON'T LACK,
"GRANDMOTHER HAD THAT WONDERFUL FLOUR SACK!"


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All these girls' dresses were made from flour sacks...


Sunday, March 14, 2010

Burgoyne Surrounded


The Harlingen Arts and Heritage Museum hosted the Burgoyne Surrounded Quilt Exhibit Jan 14 to Mar 14. If you missed it, I posted pictures in our album. You can also see the info on the National Quilt Museum website.

The National Quilt Museum is pleased to host the 18 winning quilts of the 2009 Burgoyne Surrounded-themed New Quilts from an Old Favorite contest. These innovative quilts represent quilters from 10 different U.S. states as well as Germany.

Sponsored by Clover Needlecraft Inc., Fairfield Processing Corporation and Janome America, Inc., this international contest challenges quiltmakers to create original quilts based on a specific quilt pattern. Inspired by the traditional Burgoyne Surrounded pattern, the quiltmakers have modified the design in imaginative ways, providing a wonderful look at the skills, techniques and creativity of today's quiltmakers.

The Burgoyne Surrounded block derives from a key event in American history, the Battle of Saratoga. General John Burgoyne of the British Army devised the plan to march on Albany, NY, from Canada only to be surrounded and defeated by American militia. This battle proved to the world that the young American army was an effective fighting force, resulting in more interest in and support of the American cause.
First place was awarded to Cathryn Zeleny of Napa, CA, for her quilt titled Inevitable. Zeleny used hand-dyed fabric to create her interpretation of a valley surrounded by hills, as it might be seen from above. It is a visual metaphor for the surrender of Burgoyne and his troops at Saratoga.

http://picasaweb.google.com/FronteraQuiltGuild/20100314?feat=directlink

http://www.quiltmuseum.org/2009.htm