Saturday, November 27, 2010

PRESIDENT’S PATCH , submitted by Juana Simmons
Christmas was always a fun time with my mother’s family. Santa came down the stairs, them one of the younger cousins had his/ her turn telling a story or reading a Christmas story to Santa before we opened piles of gifts. There were up to 45 or so people seated in a circle around the room. Then there were always soup and chili hot with chili pequins. There were seven uncles plus my dad and Papa to keep the group laughing.

But when we went to dad’s family for Christmas it was a different story. Dad only had one sister who had two children and our family with my brother, sister and me. Mommie, my dad’s mother, had a much nicer home with silver, crystal and china where the children were expected to sit up straight eat with their mouth closed and speak when spoke to. My cousin, Barbara and I were exactly two months apart in age and the oldest grand-kids. I could and still can make her laugh! So it probably goes without saying that I made it my duty to keep she and my sister giggling. As the adults tried to keep conversation going, I would catch their eyes when those cooked carrots came around and I gagged or stuck my tongue out or when the rolls came
around, I deliberately dropped one under the table. As I picked it up, I’d pinch Barbara or tickle Beverly’s leg and they would try not to laugh! They always did and I got a scathing look from Mommie or Mother or Aunt Louise. The scenario changed from year to year but I mostly managed to create some kind of mischief to keep us all of us from being bored silly. Santa Claus never came to Mommie’s house except to solemnly leave small gifts of things like cologne or paper dolls ( which Barbara hated and always gave to me) or socks or panties, There was never candy or dolls or bicycles The author Fanny Flagg of Fried Green Tomatoes fame, said that good Southern women were always nice and kept their emotions under control. She also said that in the South, women wore beige and kept their mouths shut around their sons-in-laws.


My grandmother, Mommie’s, family was from Tennessee and came to Texas after the Civil War, but she maintained strict control by always being a lady. For her that translated into wearing washed out colors, making just enough food (and always the same thing) and giving everyone “ just a little something for Christmas”. Daddy was her only son and was expected to give her a really nice gift each Christmas, which he did, and she always reciprocated to both him and Aunt Louise. To my mother, who she never liked because she wasn’t good enough for Layton, she gave her hand cream every year. Naturally the Christmas tree was small, the gifts except for Daddy and Aunt Louise’s were barely there, I can’t remember a gift I ever got from her - even on my birthdays. I hated Christmas at her house! I loved the big boisterous tree, gifts, laughs, food and family at Mama’s house! Those Christmases are treasures in my memory,

May your Christmas be especially merry and bright!
Juana

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Stay Tuned...

Life has gotten in the way of Frontera Blogging...

I'll catch up one of these days.

In the mean time... Don't miss the December Guild meeting!!!!
December 6, 2010 Monthly Meeting Encore RV Park
$5.00 Cover Charge for non members 6:30 PM
TRUNK SHOW BY BONNIE HUNTER www.quiltville.com


ps... thanks for all your prayers for Allen and our family, plus all the ways you've blessed us.
~Linda

Monday, September 27, 2010

Happy Birthday to us, Happy Birthday to us, Happy Birthday, Dear Frontera! Happy Birthday to us!!!!!!

Well, time does fly when you're having fun!!! Retreaters will be heading off in a few days and having a wonderful time that will fly by too quickly and then on....October 11, 2010 at our Monthly Meeting Encore RV Park, 6:30 PM is....
BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION... ELECTION OF NEW OFFICERS
FRONTERA QUILT GUILD WILL BE 10 YEARS OLD...
“QUILTO” .. CAKE/ PUNCH .. Birthday presents
Don't forget to come and bring some buttons or pennies to play Quilto!

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

Almost time for elections....


At next month’s meeting the Nominating Committee will be seeking suggestions for upcoming elections. Remember to be voted into the President position the individual must have previously held some positionon the executive committee. Next month members should be prepared to nominate members into thevarious positions. They will be called and asked if they are willing to be put on the ballot. Elections are in October.

Opportunity Quilt 2010 for Frontera: “Dress to the Nines”

Everyone will have the opportunity to donate and take donations with the tickets you will receive at Guild soon. This beautiful quilt was pieced and quilted by guild members to benefit Frontera. It's so beautiful! Thank you, Ladies !!!!

Hercilia Garza has been appointed chair for ticket sales for the “Dress to the Nines”
opportunity drawing. Members are asked to sell tickets for the drawing. Tickets and quilt photo will be available at the September meeting. Drawing will be at the December 6, 2010 monthly guild meeting.

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

PRESIDENT’S PATCH Volume 10 , Issue 9 COMPLICATED ISSUES

PRESIDENT’S PATCH
Complicated Issues
In the August issue of Smithsonian, Carl Hiaasen talked about his new book, Star Island. He talks about humanity getting more and more weird. Some of the things he said struck a note for me, so Iam going to share; Mr. Hiaasen : “ When I go out to give speeches, I base it strictly on what I’ve seen here in Florida, which is that the human race is actually devolving, that we are moving backward on the evolutionary scale.” When asked what freak outrageous events do you fear are going to happen in the next 40 years? Hiassen states, “The level of discoveries will only get nastier. The Supreme Court decisions to let corporations pour as much money as they want into political advertising and do it anonymously - is toxic to the whole democratic process. From now on it’s basically all the free speech that money can buy.”
The next question and answer are what really got my attention, “Do you see any antidote?”
“Public outrage is the best antidote, because it often leads to change. But people can’t get out - raged without rapid access to solid, useful information - what we used to call journalism. There is so much garbage being disguised as facts and many posing as sages, but somebody has to cut through to the truth.”
This is my feeling because I can never tell who is telling the truth and is telling a lie. So much trivia on the TV and news to keep our attention, so many “sages” are on TV, news, papers, etc. all who claim to know t he answer. Which is debated by another “sage” who knows the answer, followed by others who know a different, better answer - all of whom make partial sense that I become mixed in a dilemma of what I think is the truth or the best or the most useful. Add to this the people who are only going to spout the “party line,” the ministries who rightly or wrongly, put their two bits in, so that decisions on a state or national level become more than the average person wants to spend time trying to figure it all out!
For me, I really do believe that most people are sincere in what they believe, but this totally weird system that has developed leaves the door wide open for misunderstanding of information. It would help, that if when someone is telling their opinion, for the press to do the research leading to it - or at least put it on the editorial page, so we know it is an opinion as opposed to the truth. though it was done with the best of intentions, it ended up being catastrophic.
1) When Brutes killed Caesar, he though he was saving the Romana Empire; The Roman
Empire almost collapsed upon itself with war trying to decide who would take Caesar’s place.
2) When the matrons in London found out about the natives who lived in the tip of South America and who wore no clothes , they gathered bundles of clothes from London and sent them on the next ship to the natives. The natives wore them, but that almost died of chicken pox.
3) At one point in England it was thought that teeth from one person could be implanted in another’s mouth. It worked until it was discovered that of most of the teeth carried the disease of syphilis.
4) Medications over the centuries were given to people, thinking they were good for what ailed them - Lead products, mercury products, taking blood, and even allowing armies no water.
All of these things were given or done by the best of intention by somebody or group who
thought they knew best.
Deliver me from the woman, man, group, or government who singly or as a group claim to have the answer to complicated times or issues!
End of frustration!
Juana

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

PRESIDENTS PATCH: Volume 10 , Issue 6 Jun . 2010


by Juana Simmons
This article from Reminisce is similar to some thing I remember and lots of things my aunts remember, but not one remembers washing quilts like this tells. However, it also reminds us of the daily importance of quilts. Enjoy , Juana

--“ Life was slow an hard growing up in a steel mill town in the Deep South during the 1950's. In Fairfield Alabama- or the Hike” to old timers- people walked to get from place to place. The landscape was filled with dirt roads, ditches, hills and few house sitting beside well- worn paths.
--As children, we knew the rules. We were to stay within calling distance, and when the few street-lights turned on, we were to be in the yard. We used to play outside all day in the winter and summer, rain or shine. Even cold weather couldn’t deter us; it just meant putting on more clothes to keep warm. And if we couldn’t find our gloves, two socks worked just as well.
--Everything at the “Hike” followed a routine. On Sunday everybody dressed up and went to church. The churches were not air conditioned either. During the 11 a.m. services, the handheld cardboard fans from the local funeral parlor would work overtime to stir up a slight breeze for the crowd. Monday was washday, when wringer washing machines were cranked on many back porches. Clothes were hung on lines to dry, while smaller items like socks, underwear and hand towels were spread across fences and bushes. The drying whites were blinding. Afer taking them off the line, I couldn’t see straight for several minutes.
--During the winter, clothes were known to freeze on the line. When that happened, you’d bring them into the house and spread them near the space heater to thaw and dry. Socks, diapers and other heavily soiled items were frequently boiled. But my favorite time of the year was quiltwashing time. A No. 2 zinc tub out in the yard was filled with warm, soapy water and then the quilts were added. As they soaked, all the young children were called to stomp out the dirt. It was a fun way to make a nickel. The wet covers were so heavy, it often took three or four women to wring one quilt out. They would throw the water -logged quilt over the fence to dry in the sun, then take it in for the night before the dew settled. Once they dried, the quilts would go into the cedar chest for the summer.
--Every Saturday the yard was swept and the trash burned, nearly every yard had a black trash-burning pile at “Hike”. Every other Sunday we got our hair washed and straightened , while the men and boys got haircuts. My mother could fix hair, and word spread fast. Soon enough, neighbors came on Friday evenings to get their hair fixed, I loved the smell of hair grease as hot irons melted it while my mom worked her magic.
--We were not allowed to hang around the kitchen as the ladies exchanged gossip, I often heard the phrase “ She broke her leg” and I wondered why so many women were breaking limbs. Imagine my surprise when I learned it meant someone was pregnant!
--Hearing about the “loss”
of relatives. I spent a lot of time looking for all those lost people before I knew what it really meant.
--All year round, the steam whistle at the steel plant governed life on the “Hike”. The 7 a.m. Whistle signaled the start of a shift at the plant and breakfast for the residents. The noon whistle meant lunchtime for everyone and the 3 p.m. blast signaled the end of the day for the school children and workers alike.
--Life continued in these predictable patterns throughout my early years until the 1960's, which would prove to be a period of rapid change. Looking back on those days, I am filled with the memories of a gentler, more innocent time.”
--By Cheryl Berry Griffin, Georgia

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

How well I remember the advertising slogan of the day:
"Eat the flour and wear the sack--
If you're not satisfied, your money back!"

HOW I WELL REMEMBER PRINTED FLOUR SACK DRESSES! HOW WE LOOKED FORWARD

TO MOM & DAD BUYING MORE FLOUR & FEED FOR THE CHICKENS TOO.


1930's flour sacks

THE FLOUR SACK


[][][][]
BY COLLEEN B. HUBERT



IN THAT LONG AGO TIME WHEN THINGS WERE SAVED,
WHEN ROADS WERE GRAVELED AND BARRELS WERE STAVED,
WHEN WORN-OUT CLOTHING WAS USED AS RAGS,
AND THERE WERE NO PLASTIC WRAP OR BAGS,
AND THE WELL AND THE PUMP WERE WAY OUT BACK,
A VERSITILE ITEM, WAS THE FLOUR SACK.

PILLSBURY'S BEST, MOTHER'S AND GOLD MEDAL, TOO
STAMPED THEIR NAMES PROUDLY IN PURPLE AND BLUE.

THE STRING SEWN ON TOP WAS PULLED AND KEPT;
THE FLOUR EMPTIED AND SPILLS WERE SWEPT.
THE BAG WAS FOLDED AND STORED IN A SACK
THAT DURABLE, PRACTICAL FLOUR SACK.

THE SACK COULD BE FILLED WITH FEATHERS AND DOWN,
FOR A PILLOW, OR T'WOULD MAKE A NICE SLEEPING GOWN.
IT COULD CARRY A BOOK AND BE A SCHOOL BAG,
OR BECOME A MAIL SACK SLUNG OVER A NAG.
IT MADE A VERY CONVENIENT PACK,
THAT ADAPTABLE, COTTON FLOUR SACK.

BLEACHED AND SEWN, IT WAS DUTIFULLY WORN
AS BIBS, DIAPERS, OR KERCHIEF ADORNED.
IT WAS MADE INTO SKIRTS, BLOUSES AND SLIPS.
AND MOM BRAIDED RUGS FROM ONE HUNDRED STRIPS
SHE MADE RUFFLED CURTAINS FOR THE HOUSE OR SHACK,
FROM THAT HUMBLE BUT TREASURED FLOUR SACK!

AS A STRAINER FOR MILK OR APPLE JUICE,
TO WAVE MEN IN, IT WAS A VERY GOOD USE,
AS A SLING FOR A SPRAINED WRIST OR A BREAK,
TO HELP MOTHER ROLL UP A JELLY CAKE,
AS A WINDOW SHADE OR TO STUFF A CRACK,
WE USED A STURDY, COMMON FLOUR SACK!

AS DISH TOWELS, EMBROIDERED OR NOT,
THEY COVERED UP DOUGH, HELPED PASS PANS SO HOT,
TIED UP DISHES FOR NEIGHBORS IN NEED,
AND FOR MEN OUT IN THE FIELD TO SEED.
THEY DRIED DISHES FROM PAN, NOT RACK
THAT ABSORBENT, HANDY FLOUR SACK!

WE POLISHED AND CLEANED STOVE AND TABLE,
SCOURED AND SCRUBBED FROM CELLAR TO GABLE,
WE DUSTED THE BUREAU AND OAK BED POST,
MADE COSTUMES FOR OCTOBER (A SCARY GHOST)
AND A PARACHUTE FOR A CAT NAMED JACK.
FROM THAT LOWLY, USEFUL OLD FLOUR SACK!

SO NOW MY FRIENDS, WHEN THEY ASK YOU
AS CURIOUS YOUNGSTERS OFTEN DO,
"BEFORE PLASTIC WRAP, ELMERS GLUE
AND PAPER TOWELS, WHAT DID YOU DO?"
TELL THEM LOUDLY AND WITH PRIDE DON'T LACK,
"GRANDMOTHER HAD THAT WONDERFUL FLOUR SACK!"


[]

All these girls' dresses were made from flour sacks...


Sunday, March 14, 2010

Burgoyne Surrounded


The Harlingen Arts and Heritage Museum hosted the Burgoyne Surrounded Quilt Exhibit Jan 14 to Mar 14. If you missed it, I posted pictures in our album. You can also see the info on the National Quilt Museum website.

The National Quilt Museum is pleased to host the 18 winning quilts of the 2009 Burgoyne Surrounded-themed New Quilts from an Old Favorite contest. These innovative quilts represent quilters from 10 different U.S. states as well as Germany.

Sponsored by Clover Needlecraft Inc., Fairfield Processing Corporation and Janome America, Inc., this international contest challenges quiltmakers to create original quilts based on a specific quilt pattern. Inspired by the traditional Burgoyne Surrounded pattern, the quiltmakers have modified the design in imaginative ways, providing a wonderful look at the skills, techniques and creativity of today's quiltmakers.

The Burgoyne Surrounded block derives from a key event in American history, the Battle of Saratoga. General John Burgoyne of the British Army devised the plan to march on Albany, NY, from Canada only to be surrounded and defeated by American militia. This battle proved to the world that the young American army was an effective fighting force, resulting in more interest in and support of the American cause.
First place was awarded to Cathryn Zeleny of Napa, CA, for her quilt titled Inevitable. Zeleny used hand-dyed fabric to create her interpretation of a valley surrounded by hills, as it might be seen from above. It is a visual metaphor for the surrender of Burgoyne and his troops at Saratoga.

http://picasaweb.google.com/FronteraQuiltGuild/20100314?feat=directlink

http://www.quiltmuseum.org/2009.htm

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

TIME MARCHES ON!

Where does the time go? I said “the time” because time often seems like a living entity that I
should be able to rope or trick or hold back. Somehow I seem so unaware that dates have passed,
which means the numbers on the calendar have also moved - always forward and I can’t identify
what date or day I’m acting in! Every time somebody says, “I wish it was summer,” when its only
winter, I want to scream “Shut Up.” You are wishing my life away!
When I taught school, January and February would crawl by like it would last forever. Now
February not to mention January has flown by! People talk about having so much time when they
retire. Either I wasn’t watching or I was asleep because I have to think hard to remember which
year I retired. I always have more than I can do. I am busy all the time.
The oldest grandsons are 29 and 31! When did that happen? Even though they have kids,
(Well, one does have two) they both seem like about seven or nine years old. That was the year they
took off all their clothes, rolled in the mud of the irrigation ditch, came up on the front porch where
they rubbed nasty hands on the white birch which I never thought would come off. Then they went
to my back yard and rolled up in the hammocks. There I found them, naked as a jay bird! It was
several years until they told me they mooned the traffic! Oh for the days when I had the energy to
scold them.
The magazine, Reminisce upsets me when they show old 1930, 1940 and 1950 pictures and I
remember those days, the way we all looked. Surely that’s not stuff to be printed in magazines of
remembering! Then I get a glimpse of myself and think, surely this isn’t me! That lady is 45 pounds
overweight and has no necks, her boobs and butt have dropped, and hair - thinner and soft!
Whatever happened to bouncy hair that stayed in place? Oh poor me - then I look around at you!
You look like me and you’re still intelligent, vital, always making some one’s day, sending your
grand and great grand kids a new quilt, improving your skills, laughing, enjoying this life and each
other. Sigh! I hate to admit it, I really don’t want to go back there and grade all those terrible
junior and senior themes, etc.
God was right about causing time to continue on, I admit I often fight it, but I don’t want to
ruin today’s life. I have so many new friends, lunches to eat, quilts to finish and a two year old great
granddaughter to hug in March. We better grab all these things before they’re gone - because
before very long our pictures will appear in someone else’s memory - book. Grab each minute,
cherish it. Look around at a beautiful world and people to love and share who love you too.
How lucky can we be? We could be in Haiti, Afghanistan, Iraq and other places where
tomorrow is a big question - not a known but an unknown.
Spring is here and there’s things to do with people I like and some whom I even love. Come
on, Juana , get over it! Time does not stand still or wait on us, it marches on!

Monday, January 18, 2010

Craft for your Health!!!!


Excerpt From the Creative Woman Newsletter:

Crafty women don't need doctors and medical professionals to tell us what we already know: Crafting can be strong medicine for a myriad of physical and psychological ailments.

Those of us who have resolved to lose some weight this year may benefit from spending more time in the craft room. When boredom strikes, grab a paintbrush, crochet hook or glue gun instead of a doughnut. The creative process can be satisfying and effective in distracting us from those tempting treats. Instead of seeking comfort in food, seek comfort in a craft project, and you will feel more accomplished, calm and a lot less guilty.

Along with a healthy diet and exercise, meditation is often suggested for a more balanced lifestyle, and crafts can be highly meditative. For years, I have heard stories of those who feel calm and happy when crafting. Whether through repetitive movements such as needlework, using your creativity in card making, or carefully placing beads on a necklace for your friend, crafting can make us feel more calm.

Okay, Quilters.... STITCH, 2, 3, 4... STITCH, 2, 3, 4.... Breathe... relax...